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Randy R Cox

Never think that some term is not subject to change.  All things are negotiable, and everything worth doing in life demands negotiation.  As your skill improves you’ll want to stay in control of all things.  That doesn’t mean it won’t be wise to let some things be determined by the will of others.  It means you decide when the other person has his way.

If you do it well, those times will serve your interest and keep your negotiation partner feeling very good about him.  Win/win negotiation is very much about being able to get what you want and giving the other side what they want as well.

All things are negotiable.

You can use persuasion to convince them that what is good for you is exactly what they want.  Negotiation is moving them to your position.

Negotiate hard, but then give back what needs to be given back.  When you give back concessions the other side has already made it puts you in control and it also puts you in their camp.  It makes you a full partner!

You want your partner to feel you give back out of concern and never weakness.  The moment you sense they perceive weakness, is the moment to stop giving.

You can and should negotiate even the smallest of terms.  I have had store clerks agree to accept less for single purchases scanned with a scanner.  If I went through with those deals, I’m sure the difference would have come out of their own pocket.  A smile and a giveback are appropriate here, but it is great practice to know the control is mine.

Explore and experiment with your negotiations but keep in mind long term objectives are more important than the short term.

An old proverb says, “You can sheer a sheep many times, but you can only skin it once!”

  • Keep your customer and your source for the next deal.
  • Keep your reputation; be firm but fair.
  • Don’t be too easy.
  • Never kick a negotiating partner when he is down.

The video below is very entertaining.  Watch it twice!  The first time just enjoy it!  The second time, pay attention to the skilled way the negotiator gets to the deal he wants.  He is persistent and he is effective.

Everything is negotiable

Never think that some term is not subject to change. Everything is negotiable, and everything worth doing in life demands negotiation. As your skill improves you’ll want to stay in control of all things. That doesn’t mean it won’t be wise to let some things be determined by the will of others. It means you decide when the other person has his way.

If you do it well, those times will serve your interest and keep your negotiation partner feeling very good about him. Win/win negotiation is very much about being able to get what you want and giving the other side what they want as well.

You can use persuasion to convince them that what is good for you is exactly what they want. Negotiation is moving them to your position.

Negotiate hard, but then give back what needs to be given back. When you give back concessions the other side has already made it puts you in control and it also puts you in their camp. It makes you a full partner!

You want your partner to feel you give back out of concern and never weakness. The moment you sense they perceive weakness, is the moment to stop giving.

You can and should negotiate even the smallest of terms. I have had store clerks agree to accept less for single purchases scanned with a scanner. If I went through with those deals, I’m sure the difference would have come out of their own pocket. A smile and a giveback are appropriate here, but it is great practice to know the control is mine.

Explore and experiment with your negotiations but keep in mind long term objectives are more important than the short term.

An old proverb says, “You can sheer a sheep many times, but you can only skin it once!”

• Keep your customer and your source for the next deal.
• Keep your reputation; be firm but fair.
• Don’t be too easy.
• Never kick a negotiating partner when he is down.

The video below is very entertaining. Watch it twice! The first time just enjoy it! The second time, pay attention to the skilled way the negotiator gets to the deal he wants. He is persistent and he is effective.

Finally, for an in depth look consider this.  We are a compensated affiliate.

by
Randy R Cox

Sooner or later you will be tempted to use alcohol as a negotiation tactic. Since the day fermented beverage was discovered to alter mood, alcohol has been used to loosen the purse strings. In many cultures it is the traditional way to build relationships of trust before commitment is made. Conference table or campfire, the jug has been passed around for centuries.Malt Whiskey


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If your prospect orders a martini, it is a little awkward to order a Dr. Pepper. Keep in mind that even a single drink can influence the parties of a negotiation significantly, perhaps positively, perhaps not. If you use it, the absolute rule should be to use less than your negotiating partner. The successful negotiator maintains control.

As I negotiated as an electrical contractor, or more recently an insurance adjuster, alcohol use would have been unthinkable. Either of these activities are sensitive enough that alcohol would be an inexcusable mix. On the other hand, as an art dealer holding public art shows for our stable of artists, we always provided wine and cheese. Customers seldom regret purchase of art but closing the sale is difficult when it concerns relatively large expenditures of money for things that just hang on a wall or sit on a pedestal. Most of the larger art sales happened later in the evening when walks were wobbly and tongues thick. Sometimes when people spend their hard earned money, they want to feel good and have a good time.

I just heard about a deal maker (everybody is a deal maker) that decided to do a little fishing and relaxation between negotiations. He’d been at the lake for a while casting his artificial lures to and fro, but having no luck at all. Not far from where he stood, he spotted a cottonmouth water moccasin with a frog in his mouth.

Frogs make good bass bait!

Being an aggressive bargainer–always ready to make his move when the advantage is right—the fisherman decided the snake could not bite him with the frog in his mouth. Quick as a wink, he grabbed that snake just behind the head and took that frog for his own hook.

Now he had a problem. He had the snake well in hand, but that cottonmouth was not in a good mood at all. How could he release an angry snake without it coming back to get revenge? He looked around. He didn’t have much to work with, but a good negotiator works with what he has. The half filled whiskey bottle he had brought for relaxation and companionship was stuffed in the fork of a low tree there beside him.

He took that whiskey bottle, popped the cork and poured three of four generous slugs down the captive snakes open mouth. When the snake’s eyes crossed, he figured he was safe enough. He flung that snake as far as he could throw him into the lake, and he went back to his fishing.

After a few minutes he felt something tugging at his pant leg. He looked down, and there was that snake looking up at him–this time with two frogs in his mouth. He had come back for another drink!

Alcohol can be an effective tactic, but it can be dangerous when it gets out of hand. Plying your negotiating partner with liquor is like playing with snakes. You have to be very careful or it can come back to bite you!

As long as man adapts there will be new techniques for negotiation. There is no complete source but the one book that delivers seasoned tactics and strategies to the experienced and inexperienced negotiator is Negotiate to Win by Jim Thomas
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Never accept the first offer.  In case I didn’t get it right the first time, again, “Never accept the first offer you receive.”

Whether you are buying or selling, hiring or applying for a job, accepting the first offer violates the whole premise of win win negotiation.  Don’t do it!  No matter how tempting it is, don’t accept the first offer!

A good negotiator is a partner…not an opponent in making a deal.  Both parties need to win.  When both parties to a negotiation feel good about the outcome, the chances of additional deals are great.

If you grab the first offer and run with it, the other party will feel like he left money or terms on the table.  Even if it is a great deal for him, he will feel like he did so poorly that you accepted before he could change it.  He will always feel badly about the deal.

Even if the first offer is a great one, the skilled negotiator will counter offer.  Negotiate!  If the first offer is firm, and your counter offer is rejected, adjust it and try again.

There should be a logical sequence to the adjustments you make as you counter offer.  With each new counter offer, you want to present a concession moving toward your partner’s offer.

You should have a definite bottom line beyond which you will just not go.  Know your bottom line before you even start.  Each concession should move toward the bottom line in a proportionate manner signaling  you are getting closer and closer to your absolute rock hard position.

Suppose you are trying to buy something and the first offer is $100 dollars.  If your original target price before the offer was $150, you’ve already got better than you had to have, but don’t just accept it.  Counter offer $50.   When that is rejected offer $75.  If that is rejected try  $90 then $95, finally $99.

Notice that each new counter offer you make moves in a smaller piece than your last concession.  You are sending signals that you are getting closer and closer to your bottom line.   Chances are good that you will get an acceptance somewhere between $75 and $90.

Sometimes poor negotiators  are genuinely firm in their price.  They only have the first offer and refuse to negotiate.  If you have one of these guys, you will make him happier if you negotiate your way from one concession to the next.  Even if he refuses to budge on price and you settle for the $100 he will feel as though you drove a hard bargain and he got as much as possible from you.  When you offered the $99, you are signaling that you are leaving nothing on the table by the progression you have made.

When such a deal is over, you get a price that is better than you expected.  Remember your bottom line was $150.  You’ll know you left little on the table because you tried to get it.  Your partner will feel good because he got what he was asking.  Everybody wins!

by Randy Cox

I promised that the fine art of negotiation  would be a subject covered here on Cash153.com.  It is hard to imagine how we could accumulate any sizable sum of money without some skill`at negotiation.  Something as critical to success as negotiation should be practiced with the pleasure of a fine art, but more often we do it only as a last resort because we have to.

Americans are the worst negotiators in the world.  Jim Thomas, in his book “Negotiate to Win” points out that America was settled by the sons and daughters of the old world who failed to negotiate a good place for themselves in their native land.

Instead of negotiating  they ran away.  They came to the New World to start over.   Some of them found their way here, but others still failed to negotiate a place for themselves.  They went west!

The whole history of America is replete with failures moving west for a new beginning, a fresh start.  That’s the story of hope, toughness, survival…but not the story of negotiation.

The farther west we go, the worse the average negotiation skills.  Most Americans offer one price, take it or leave it!  Many of them feel insulted if you try to negotiate.  They have an air about them that says, “This is my best offer!”  If you don’t like this, you must think I’m trying to cheat you.

There are a lot of reasons why this is not true and we will cover them in a later article.

In the rest of the world, money doesn’t flow so freely as in America. Here it comes easy; it goes easy–many times without so much as a haggle.  Elsewhere people want to hang onto their money for a while before it goes to someone else.  They want to make sure they have a good deal before they give it up.  They savor the process of bargaining.

We don’t want the bother of a negotiation.  If we need more money we can always make more.  There seems to be no need to hold it tight.

Americans are in a hurry.  We want a quick deal and we want  it fast. We want to cut to the chase, and consequently we are lousy at negotiating. We seem to  hate it!

I don’t have the time right now to cover all you need to know,but you can’t wait.  You need negotiation skill right now.

Bob Parsons has done a good crash course video on negotiations.  He covers most of the same things I plan to cover and does so in a very entertaining  manner.

You can find the video here:
http://www.bobparsons.me/article.php?id=209

Check this out and learn his techniques.

More later,

Randy Cox